LEGAL TECH

Caution!

More than 150,500 attorneys are eligible to practice law in California. Many attorneys share the same names.

All discipline reports should be read carefully for names, ages, addresses and bar numbers. Attorneys must report address changes within 30 days.

Discipline Key


Disbarment


Attorney's name is stricken from roster of California attorneys by the California Supreme Court and he/she is ineligible to practice law. Attorney may be required to notify clients and interested parties of the disbarment.


Suspension/probation


Suspended from the practice of law for specified period of time. Suspensions may include a requirement of compliance with conditions of probation and a period of actual suspension from practice. Attorney may not practice law during a period of actual suspension. Attorney may be required to pass the California Professional Responsibility Examination and/or notify clients and interested parties of the suspension.


Resignation with discipline charges pending


Attorney voluntarily resigns as a member of the State Bar while disciplinary investigation or proceeding is pending. These disciplinary matters may be reopened if the attorney applies for reinstatement to the practice of law.


Interim suspension following criminal conviction


An attorney who has been convicted of a crime that involves or probably involves moral turpitude may be temporarily suspended from the practice of law pending the finality of his/her conviction and a determination regarding the degree of attorney discipline that should be imposed as a result of that conviction.


Further discipline for failure to comply with a previous order


An attorney may be suspended from practice or disbarred for failure to comply with requirements imposed by the California Supreme Court in prior disciplinary orders.


Involuntary inactive enrollment


Attorney is enrolled as an inactive member of the State Bar pursuant to Business & Professions Code 6007 and is ineligible to practice law pending further order.


Public reproval


Attorney found culpable of professional misconduct, but no period of suspension imposed. Attorney's name, imposition of discipline are public.


Private reproval


Attorney found culpable of professional misconduct, but no period of suspension imposed. Attorney's name is not publicized. Attorney may be required to pass the Professional Responsibility Examination and/or comply with conditions similar to probation.


DISBARMENTS

RONALD LEE CLEVENGER [#105088], 53, of Modesto was disbarred March 22, 1996, and ordered to comply with Rule 955 of the California Rules of Court.

Clevenger's disbarment followed misconduct which involved multiple acts of wrongdoing over a significant period of time. One client lost nearly $25,000, which also financially affected his medical care providers.

The client hired Clevenger to represent him after he was seriously injured in an automobile accident. Two insurance companies settled the claims for $15,000 each and the checks were deposited into Clevenger's client trust account.

However, only one lienholder was paid and the client was forced to write personal checks to satisfy medical providers. The client attempted numerous times to contact Clevenger, but he was unsuccessful and later learned that the lawyer had vacated his office. Clevenger's client trust account also fell below the required balance.

Clevenger's wife, a non-attorney, met with the client and presented him with a "final settlement" showing a purported distribution of the funds. But the client refused to sign the release, since he knew the lienholders were threatening to turn his account over to a collection agency.

In failing to make any effort to provide restitution to the client, the bar court found that Clevenger demonstrated indifference toward rectification for the consequences of his misconduct.

"The applicable standards reflect that disbarment is in order since the amount of [Clevenger's] misappropriation of client funds was considerable and the mitigation found here is by no means compelling," the disbarment order read.

DAVID MAX CLAUS [#122553], 44, of Richmond was disbarred March 22, 1996, and ordered to comply with Rule 955.

Claus was disbarred after he failed to comply with Rule 955 of the California Rules of Court, as directed by a March 1995 disciplinary order.

In the prior discipline, Claus was found culpable of engaging in the unauthorized practice of law in a federal criminal matter and failing to maintain a current address with the bar's membership department.

Although Claus was admitted to practice in 1986, the bar court found that he was not entitled to sufficient mitigation to overcome the effect of his wilful failure to comply with orders of the Supreme Court.

DAVID ALBERT EHMANN [#34602], 58, of Brisbane was disbarred March 22, 1996, and ordered to comply with Rule 955.

Ehmann failed to comply with Rule 955, a condition of a 1995 disciplinary order.

In May 1995, Ehmann received a two-year stayed suspension with three years probation and 90 days actual suspension. His misconduct included client abandonment, failure to report sanctions and failing to maintain a current address with the State Bar.

Because Ehmann did not keep his address current with the bar, notice of the 1995 court order and other bar correspondence were returned by the post office as undeliverable.

Ehmann's prior record of discipline also includes a July 1994 stayed suspension for abandoning a client and failing to maintain a current address, and an April 1995 probation revocation and one-year suspension.

His failure to participate in the disbarment proceedings was viewed as an aggravating factor.

DENNIS PAUL ORPHAN [#86583], 45, of Garden Grove was disbarred March 22, 1996.

Orphan has been the subject of five disciplinary proceedings since his admission to the bar in 1979. The bar court found that his record demonstrates a pattern of misconduct.

In the current matter, Orphan's misconduct centered around numerous trust account violations.

His previous misconduct resulted in a public reproval in 1992 and involved a client matter and two criminal conviction cases.

In the client matter, he failed to obey a court order, failed to complete legal services and improperly withdrew from representation in one case.

He also was convicted of misdemeanor driving with a suspended license and other infractions.

In October 1994, he was suspended for one year, stayed, with a 60-day actual suspension after he failed to comply with conditions of the 1992 public reproval.

In January 1995, he was found culpable of misconduct warranting discipline in three conviction referral matters, all of which involved driving without a license.

In its decision, the bar court said, "it is clear that given [Orphan's] misconduct in this matter, which includes acts of moral turpitude or dishonesty, his record of prior discipline, and his repeated failure to participate in these past proceedings, nothing short of disbarment will adequately protect the public."


SUSPENSIONS/PROBATION

ANGELA BARSEGHIAN [#140852], 41, of Beverly Hills was suspended for one year, stayed, and placed on probation for two years with an actual suspension of 30 days, effective March 22, 1996. She also was ordered to pass the CPRE.

Barseghian failed to honor a client's medical liens, despite numerous attempts by the medical provider to collect the funds.

The physician was eventually successful in obtaining a small claims court judgment against Barseghian, but by the end of 1995 it had not been paid.

In aggravation, Barseghian demonstrated indifference to the consequences of her misconduct by not paying the physician in a timely manner.

In mitigation, Barseghian has no prior record of discipline since her admission to the bar in 1989.

GERARD EDMUND SABO [#74988], 45, of Los Angeles was suspended for one year, stayed, and placed on probation for two years, effective March 22, 1996. He also was ordered to pass the CPRE.

Sabo's misconduct involved multiple acts of wrongdoing and included failure to communicate with clients, competently perform legal services, release client files and cooperate with the bar's investigation.

In one matter, Sabo was employed by a couple to represent them in several civil matters dealing with their health insurance coverage.

Sabo initially performed some legal services, prepared complaints for two lawsuits and arranged for one of the clients to undergo emergency medical treatment. But he neglected to file or serve the suits.

Sabo also did not tell the couple that the lawsuits were never filed and the statute of limitations expired.

A collection agency eventually filed a lawsuit against the couple to collect funds owed by their defunct health insurance company and the couple secured the services of another attorney.

At one point, Sabo agreed to assist the couple in working out a settlement with a medical center, but he failed to follow through and the clients were forced to negotiate their own settlement with the center's attorney.

He did, however, review the settlement and negotiate some revisions which were beneficial to the clients.

In aggravation, Sabo's misconduct involved multiple acts of wrongdoing and his actions significantly harmed a client.

In mitigation, Sabo has no prior record of discipline since his admission to the bar in 1977.

At the time of his misconduct, Sabo was experiencing marital problems which resulted in the end of his 12-year marriage.

His marital problems and support of two households with four children caused him intense emotional and financial stress.

He has expressed remorse for his actions, accepted responsibility for his actions and plans to take steps to atone for his misconduct.

RIGOBERTO OBREGON [#130589], 34, of Los Angeles was suspended for 90 days, stayed, and placed on probation for one year, effective March 22, 1996. He also was ordered to pass the CPRE.

Obregon's misconduct involved five matters involving bankruptcy cases and client trust account violations.

In one of the bankruptcy matters, Obregon was hired by a client who paid him advanced fees of $1,500 to file a Chapter 13 proceeding.

Obregon performed most of the legal services, but was unable to complete them due to the clerk's dismissal of the case.

The client hired another attorney and requested Obregon to return $1,000 of the advanced fees. Although Obregon disputed the amount, he issued the check more than a year later in order to resolve the problem.

However, he placed a stop payment order on the check after he learned that the client filed a complaint with the State Bar.

The client eventually won a small claims judgment against Obregon and negotiated a settlement of $1,800.

In two other instances, Obregon failed to maintain sufficient records for his client trust account and allowed the account to drop below the required balance.

JACK H. KAUFMAN JR. [#57450], 47, of San Diego was suspended for 18 months, stayed, and placed on probation for 18 months, including 90 days actual suspension, effective March 22, 1996.

Credit toward the period of actual suspension was given for the period of interim suspension which began Aug. 15, 1995. He also was ordered to pass the CPRE.

Between December 1993 and April 1994, Kaufman wrote a total of 43 checks on his business account which were dishonored due to insufficient funds.

A check for $1,689, payment for a hotel bill in Yosemite National Park, led to his prosecution by the U.S. Attorney. Kaufman later made restitution for all the dishonored checks.

In aggravation, Kaufman's misconduct involved multiple instances of wrongdoing.

In mitigation, he was candid and cooperated with the bar's investigation. He also took steps to rectify his misconduct by making restitution.

Kaufman was admitted to the bar in 1973 and has no prior record of discipline.

BRUCE M. BROWN [#135036], 35, of Phoenix was suspended for two years, stayed, and placed on probation for three years on condition that he is actually suspended for 60 days and until he makes restitution, effective March 22, 1996.

He also was ordered to return one client's files and papers dealing with the case of another client, provide an accounting of and return unearned fees, and submit the issue of fees to binding arbitration.

If the period of actual suspension exceeds two years, he will remain suspended until he has shown proof of his rehabilitation and fitness to practice law. He also was ordered to pass the CPRE.

In one matter, Brown was hired in January 1992 to represent a client in a bankruptcy case. For the next six months, Brown maintained minimal communication with his client and assured her that he was working on the matter.

The client became concerned about her case and on one occasion went to Brown's home but was told he was too ill to speak to her.

In June 1992, the client paid an additional filing fee to Brown who assured her that the petition would be filed in two weeks. However, he neglected to do so.

In August 1992, Brown told the client that he was referring her case to the State Bar because he was ill and not capable of practicing law. He voluntarily placed himself on inactive status.

The client then discovered that Brown and his family had moved from their home, but she did her own investigative work and obtained an Ohio address for him.

The client eventually lost her mobile home and moved to another state, and the Client Security Fund reimbursed her for the $620 in attorney's fees she advanced to Brown.

Because Brown's misconduct occurred after only four years of practice, his lack of a prior record of discipline was not given any weight in mitigation.

There were many factors in aggravation. Brown's misconduct in two client matters involved multiple acts of wrongdoing. He failed to communicate and perform services and his actions significantly harmed his clients.

He also demonstrated indifference toward the rectification of or atonement for the consequences of misconduct and he failed to participate in disciplinary proceedings prior to the entry of default.

As a probation requirement, Brown was ordered to provide proof of psychiatric or psychological treatment.

KAREN CROFT NELSON [#81049], 54, of Shingle Springs was actually suspended for 60 days, effective March 22, 1996, and until she files a specified declaration recommended by the hearing department of the State Bar Court.

If the period of actual suspension is less than two years, she will be placed on probation for two years. If she remains actually suspended for two years or more, she will not be placed on probation, but will remain actually suspended until she provides proof of her rehabilitation and fitness to practice law.

If the period of actual suspension exceeds 90 days, she must comply with Rule 955. She also was ordered to pass the CPRE.

In this default matter, Nelson was found culpable of failing to comply with probation conditions from a public reproval, properly withdraw from employment, return a client file and cooperate with the State Bar.

In another matter, Nelson was hired by a woman in August 1992 to substitute in as attorney in a divorce.

Nelson failed to make an appearance at a hearing, but assured the client that everything was being handled.

In November 1992, the client told Nelson she was terminating her employment. Nelson left a message on her answering machine that she could pick up a substitution of attorney form from her office.

However, when the client arrived to pick up the form, she was told by a receptionist that Nelson had vacated the office and removed all of her files.

Nelson missed another appearance and the client eventually signed a marital agreement without the benefit of counsel because she was unable to afford another attorney.

In the disciplinary probation matter, Nelson was publicly reproved in April 1994. She neglected to file required quarterly probation reports and did not provide proof of psychiatric or psychological treatment within the allotted time period.

DAVID M. SHABY II [#97871], 43, of Culver City was suspended for one year, stayed, and placed on probation for three years, including four months actual suspension, effective March 22, 1996.

He also was ordered to pass the CPRE and comply with Rule 955 of the California Rules of Court.

In this conviction referral, Shaby was disciplined after he pleaded no contest to capping, a felony violation of the insurance code which was reduced to a misdemeanor at sentencing.

Charges of insurance fraud and attempted grand theft were dismissed.

Shaby was hired by a client to represent him in a personal injury matter involving an auto accident. Shaby referred the client to a chiropractor for his neck and back problems.

Shaby later submitted medical bills to the insurance company, including a bill for treatment of a knee injury which was not the result of the client's auto accident.

Shaby and the chiropractor agreed that in consideration of Shaby's referral, payment of the medical bills would be limited to one-third of any settlement received from the insurance company.

Although Shaby received the client's $15,000 settlement check from the insurance company, he never deposited or cashed it.

In mitigation, Shaby displayed candor and cooperated with the bar's investigation and he took steps to obtain an early resolution of the matter.

He has been an active volunteer in the legal community for a number of years, serving as a judge pro tem and representing clients on a pro bono basis.

He is a local bar activist, a reserve police officer and community volunteer.

Shaby has no prior record of discipline in 14 years of practice and no prior record of conviction.

ALLEN DAVID SHUGAR [#38695], 63, of Los Angeles was suspended for two years, stayed, and placed on probation for two years with 18 months actual suspension, effective March 22, 1996. He also was ordered to comply with Rule 955.

Shugar's misconduct involved his failure to abide by probation conditions of a previous disciplinary order and improperly entering into a business agreement with a client.

For a period of eight years, Shugar represented a friend in numerous client matters. In 1993, the friend hired Shugar to substitute in as attorney in a pending suit against an oil company.

Prior to distribution of settlement funds from the case, the client reluctantly lent Shugar $9,000 "for a few weeks." Shugar neglected to inform the client that he should consult another attorney before making the loan and he did not put the loan agreement in writing.

He did not distribute the settlement funds to the client in a timely manner and he did not repay the loan until a year later.

Shugar has a prior record of discipline and at the time of his current misconduct a prior disciplinary matter was pending before the State Bar.

Effective March 24, 1994, Shugar received a two-year stayed suspension with 60 days actual suspension. Among other things, he was disciplined for disobeying court orders which resulted in the issuance of arrest warrants, he failed to bring one client's case to trial within five years and he was found culpable of other misconduct warranting discipline for a second offense of driving under the influence of alcohol.

His current discipline also involves his failure to abide by probation conditions stemming from the March 1994 order.

In addition, Shugar received a private reproval in 1991 for misconduct involving three clients. In one of those matters, Shugar failed to advise a client to seek independent counsel regarding the terms of a loan.

In its decision, the hearing department of the State Bar Court noted that Shugar "is no stranger to the duties required of an attorney when entering into a business transaction with a client" and that his actions do not speak well of his "willingness to learn from his mistakes and alter his behavior."

CHARLES H. KROHN [#77073], 44, of Los Angeles was suspended for three years, stayed, and placed on probation for 42 months, effective March 28, 1996. He also was ordered to comply with Rule 955.

Krohn's misconduct involved multiple acts of wrongdoing, including failure to perform services on behalf of five clients.

In one matter, Krohn was hired by a client to represent him in a civil matter. In January 1992, a default judgment of nearly $35,000 was entered when Krohn's client neglected to file a responsive pleading.

In November 1992, Krohn filed a motion to vacate the default and set aside the judgment, but the opposing attorney never received the notice and did not answer the motion.

In December 1992, the court granted Krohn's motion. However, Krohn failed to notify opposing counsel or serve him with a copy of the proposed order, as required by the California Rules of Court.

When opposing counsel learned of the order in February 1993, he filed a motion for relief and a request for monetary sanctions.

The court eventually reinstated the judgment against Krohn's client and ordered him to pay $1,839 in sanctions to the opposing party in the lawsuit.

Krohn failed to report the court-ordered sanctions to the State Bar.

In aggravation, Krohn's misconduct involved multiple acts of wrongdoing and he has a prior record of discipline. In July 1994, he received a two-year stayed suspension with 60 days actual suspension.

In mitigation, Krohn suffered from a chronic respiratory infection during the period of his misconduct. His medical problems, along with the side affects of his medication, contributed to his problems and exacerbated symptoms of his battle with Attention Deficit Disorder (ADD).

He voluntarily agreed to be enrolled as an inactive member of the bar as a means of protecting the public and effectively treating his medical problems.

DOUGLAS L. BROWN [#85001], 44, of North Hollywood was suspended for two years, stayed, placed on probation for three years with an actual suspension of 90 days, and was ordered to comply with Rule 955 of the California Rules of Court. The order took effect April 4, 1996.

Brown stipulated to practicing law while suspended for a month in 1994. He also was on probation at the time and did not submit quarterly probation reports, nor did he cooperate with the State Bar's investigation.

In a second matter, he failed to return a client's file and didn't cooperate with the bar's investigation of that case.

Brown's prior record consisted of probation for two years and 30 days actual suspension.

ROBERT T. MATTHEWS [#104112], 40, of Irvine was suspended for one year, stayed, placed on probation for three years and was ordered to take the CPRE within one year. The order took effect April 4, 1996.

Matthews pleaded guilty in 1994 to possession of a controlled substance, a felony, after he bought $20 of rock cocaine from an undercover officer in Santa Ana. The conviction did not involve moral turpitude but involved other misconduct warranting discipline.

In mitigation, he had no record of discipline since his 1982 admission to the bar, he underwent a 21-day residential treatment program, he agreed to perform community service and he belongs to alcohol and substance abuse support groups.

The probation of STAFFORD WILLIAM PRANTE [#26603], 68, of El Cajon was revoked and he was placed on probation with conditions until Nov. 1, 1996. The probation began April 7, 1996.

Prante was given a five-year stayed suspension in 1991, but failed to file the quarterly probation reports.

His original discipline resulted from receiving improper loans from his clients, negligent misappropriation of $500, and improperly withdrawing from representation without protecting his client's rights.

Prante has brought himself current with the terms and conditions of probation, including attending Alcoholics Anonymous and performing pro bono work.

AUGUST KIM ANDERSON [#113718], 40, of Encinitas was suspended for three years, stayed, and placed on three years probation with an actual suspension of 60 days and until she makes restitution. If the period of actual suspension exceeds two years, Anderson must prove rehabilitation and fitness to practice. If the actual suspension exceeds 90 days, she must comply with Rule 955. The order took effect April 7, 1996.

Anderson was hired in 1987 to represent an elderly, wheelchair-bound client in a civil matter. The client paid a $3,500 retainer fee, but within two months fired Anderson and demanded a refund. Anderson did not return any of the fee, but a fee arbitrator awarded the entire amount, less $150 for an hour and a half of work, to the client.

Contending that the $3,500 was a non-refundable retainer, Anderson sued the client for breach of contract and fraud and sought to have the arbitration award vacated. The client countersued. When Anderson failed to appear at the trial, the court awarded the client $5,775, including damages for professional negligence.

Anderson's motion for a new trial was denied, so she appealed. When the appeal was later dismissed at her request, her client sought a debtor's examination. Anderson had not satisfied the court judgment at the time of the examination.

Despite Anderson's claims that she offered to repay the client with monthly installments and that she offered her blind horse and her horse trailer as repayment, her client's attorney said no such offers had been made.

Anderson also claimed she was not notified of a trial date and was unaware of the professional negligence judgment because of problems with her mail service. She also was unaware of the requirement that such a judgment be reported to the bar.

The State Bar Court found that Anderson was required to repay the client's fee as determined by the arbitration award. However, even though she may have made misrepresentations to the bar concerning the judgment against her, she was not charged with making misleading statements.

The court found that Anderson's actions "were designed to drag (her client) through as many burdensome legal hoops as possible" and that she was "responsible for the substantial cost, anxiety and inconvenience" to her client.

Anderson was publicly reproved last year for representing a joint venture in which she had an interest and for failing to disclose that interest. The retainer agreement signed by her partner in the enterprise contained a clause limiting her liability for malpractice.

PATRICK JOSEPH MOCCI [#147367], 31, of Pasadena was suspended for one year, stayed, and placed on one year of probation with an actual suspension of 90 days and until he provides the State Bar with required membership information, such as his current address. If the actual suspension exceeds two years, Mocci will remain actually suspended until he proves rehabilitation and fitness to practice. He also was ordered to take the Multistate Professional Responsibility Examination and comply with Rule 955. The order took effect April 7, 1996.

In a default hearing, the State Bar Court found that Mocci's conviction of being a public nuisance did not involve moral turpitude but did involve other misconduct warranting discipline.

The conviction resulted from an incident in December 1993 when Mocci went to a bar in Manhattan Beach dressed in a Santa Claus suit. When the bar closed, he prevailed upon two women to give him a ride to his hotel.

The driver ordered him out of the car when he criticized her driving. He refused, grabbed a steering wheel locking device and began hitting the inside of the car. The frightened driver tried to intimidate Mocci with a toy gun she kept under the seat, but he grabbed that as well, took the driver's purse and the locking club and fled.

He was arrested and later pleaded no contest to a public nuisance charge. A grand theft charge was dropped.

According to Mocci's criminal file, he has a history of substance abuse problems, violent behavior and psychological dysfunction. He was well known to the Manhattan Beach police for making meritless claims, theft and unlawful possession of a firearm. In one instance, he was arrested at the Los Angeles airport for trespassing onto the runway and climbing into an open airplane.

The court found misconduct warranting discipline because Mocci's "violent behavior in the car and snatching (the driver's) purse not only demonstrate disrespect for the law and demean the integrity of the profession, but also reflect alcohol-drug abuse and mental health problems that are adversely affecting (Mocci's) private life."

Because he had recently been treated for substance abuse, the court did not recommend further treatment but required therapy as a condition of probation.

ARTHUR GUTIERREZ LONGORIA [#71723], 46, of West Covina was suspended for three years, stayed, and was placed on three years probation with an actual 30-day suspension. The order took effect April 7, 1996.

Longoria has been suspended since 1990, but his name and bar number appeared as co-counsel on a pleading filed on behalf of a friend involved in a civil suit.

Although the client was aware of his suspension, Longoria did not notify the court or opposing counsel. It was stipulated that Longoria held himself out as an active member of the bar.

In mitigation, he believed his name and bar number were listed on the pleading for mailing purposes only since substitute counsel was using his address. He was cooperative and candid with the bar's investigators. In aggravation, Longoria has a prior record of discipline.

ROBERT CHARLES KOPPLE [#43478], 52, of Los Angeles was suspended for one year, stayed, placed on three years of probation with 60 days actual suspension and ordered to take the CPRE within one year. The order took effect April 7, 1996.

Kopple solicited a personal loan of $400,000 from two clients, secured by second mortgages on two farms in Iowa. He did not notify the clients in writing of the conflict of interest involved in the transaction, nor did he advise them to seek independent counsel.

Kopple failed to adequately supervise his agents in Iowa to make certain the second mortgages were recorded. He then refinanced the first mortgages on each farm without notifying his clients.

Although Kopple made quarterly interest payments on the loan for two years, he stopped payments on advice of counsel.

In mitigation, Kopple practiced for 27 years without any discipline, he cooperated with the bar's investigation, and he has a long history of community service and involvement with professional activities.

The probation of JAMES PATRICK HERON [#45331], 52, of San Rafael was revoked, he was suspended from practice for one year, stayed, and placed on probation until July 9, 1997. The order took effect April 7, 1996.

Heron was suspended in 1993 and ordered to make restitution to two individuals within 18 months. He failed to do so or to make any attempt to modify the restitution requirement.

His original suspension was ordered as the result of failure to pay medical liens, writing checks against insufficient funds, commingling and the unauthorized practice of law.


RESIGNATIONS/ CHARGES PENDING

HORACE EDWIN DUNBAR JR. [#68322], 60, of Saratoga (March 22, 1996)

JACKIE RAY TURNER JR. [#113845], 41, of Vista (March 22, 1996)


PUBLIC REPROVALS

JAMES JOSEPH BROWN III [#169686], 40, of Westlake Village (Feb. 11, 1996)

VICTORIA L. O'HARA [#90019], 46, of Ellicott City, Md. (Feb. 18, 1996)

WILLIAM D. WEIGAND JR. [#27613], 68, of San Fernando (Feb. 26, 1996)

ROBERT R. SCHALDACH [#85290], 51, of Sacramento (April 3, 1996)

CRAIG MICHAEL LYTLE [#84430], 53, of Hermosa Beach (May 5, 1996)


INTERIM SUSPENSION

GARY L. MESTMAN [#147058], 34, of Los Angeles was placed on interim suspension March 12, 1996, after he was convicted of assault with a firearm, threatening with a firearm and making terrorist threats.

He was ordered to comply with Rule 955.


SUSPENSIONS/ FAILURE TO PASS PRE

DEBRA BROUSSARD [#108245], 38, of Camarillo (March 29, 1996)

DANIEL N. HOFFMAN [#31949], 69, of Santa Clara (March 29, 1996)

JOHN VINCENT HANAHAN [#154287], 29, of San Francisco (March 29, 1996)

C. STEVEN CATHERS [#137827], 48, of Fallbrook (March 29, 1996)

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