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Caution!

More than 155,100 attorneys are eligible to practice law in California. Many attorneys share the same names.

All discipline reports should be read carefully for names, ages, addresses and bar numbers. Attorneys must report address changes within 30 days.


Disbarments

MICHAEL L. McDONALD [#123737], 45, of Rancho Cordova was disbarred July 27, 1997, and ordered to comply with rule 955.

McDonald was disciplined last year with a three-year stayed suspension, three years of probation, one year actual suspension and a restitution requirement. He also was ordered to comply with rule 955 by notifying all pertinent parties of his suspension and filing an affidavit to that effect with the Supreme Court.

He failed to do so and the disbarment was recommended in a default proceeding.

The original discipline resulted from misconduct in three client matters, including failure to perform legal services competently, properly maintain funds in his client trust account, return client funds, return unearned fees, communicate with clients and cooperate with the bar's investigation. He also misappropriated client funds.

LAWRENCE STANLEY TUCCORI [#37735], 57, of Fresno was disbarred July 27, 1997, and ordered to comply with rule 955.

Tuccori failed to comply with an earlier rule 955 order imposed when he was placed on interim suspension in April 1996. The interim suspension resulted from Tuccori's 1995 conviction on one count of committing a lewd and lascivious act on a child.

He did not participate in these proceedings.

PAULA FRANCES SCHMIDT [#56075], 50, of Woodside was disbarred July 27, 1997, and ordered to comply with rule 955.

Schmidt was ordered to comply with rule 955 last year when she was placed on actual suspension for one year. She did not notify pertinent parties of her suspension or file the required affidavit with the Supreme Court.

Schmidt's discipline problems began with a 1993 public reproval for failure to perform legal services competently and failing to cooperate with the bar's investigation.

When she violated a probation condition, she was suspended and placed on two years of probation. It was her failure to comply with the conditions of that probation that led to her suspension for one year, which in turn led to the disbarment.

She also has been enrolled inactive three times since 1993 for failing to pay bar dues and pass the professional responsibility exam.

MARK WAYNE HACKMAN [#139009], 41, of Marina Del Rey was disbarred July 31, 1997, and ordered to comply with rule 955.

Hackman's misconduct involved seven clients and included the misappropriation of almost $27,000 from five clients, numerous trust account violations, failure to communicate, failure to promptly return unearned fees and commingling.

In one instance, Hackman was hired by a client in 1991 to represent him in a criminal matter. The client gave Hackman a $17,000 check which he had received from the Bureau of Indian Affairs and Hackman deposited into his client trust account.

The client later asked Hackman to give his sister $1,200 of the money and $200 for the client's own use. Two months later, the balance in the account had dropped to $10.75, and by April 1992 no funds remained.

When the client was released from prison in July 1994, he asked that Hackman return the funds to him. However, Hackman told him the account was empty. He made a few payments, stopped, then agreed in April 1996 to make complete restitution.

Although Hackman repaid all his clients, restitution was accorded little weight in mitigation because it was made only after threatened litigation or the filing of disciplinary charges.

In addition, his lack of a prior record of discipline was not given mitigating weight because his misconduct began in 1991, three years after his admission to the bar.

Hackman presented seven character witnesses, but the court did not find an "extraordinary demonstration" of his good character." He has been an extremely active member of a recognized religion [Buddhism] but, for much of that time, he was also using unlawful substances and misappropriating his clients' funds," wrote the court.

Hackman's pro bono activities were considered in mitigation, specifically, his numerous hours spent in planning and implementing the successful intervention of a young girl addicted to drugs.

He also cooperated with the bar's investigation.

The court rejected Hackman's contention that it should consider the influence of his involvement in eastern religions, including Buddhism, on the process of recovery from his abuse of drugs, which he claimed had been ongoing since 1974. However, no reliable evidence was presented to indicate that his addiction is permanently under control.

Aggravating circumstances included his addiction to cocaine and the significant harm to several of his clients due to his misappropriation of client trust funds.

NEOMA RUTH KNITTER [#92405], 56, of Desert Hot Springs was disbarred July 31, 1997, and ordered to comply with rule 955.

Knitter was disbarred after she wilfully failed to comply with rule 955, a requirement of a June 1996 disciplinary order.

At that time, Knitter received a two-year stayed suspension, two years of probation and a six-month actual suspension.

Aggravating circumstances included her prior record of five discipline matters which involved misconduct such as failure to make restitution to a client, communicate, return a case file, refund unearned fees, enforce a Colorado judgment in California and return client property.

She also failed to cooperate with the bar's investigation in one matter or enroll in the bar's ethics school, a condition of a disciplinary order.

The court found that Knitter demonstrated her unwillingness or inability to comply with her professional obligations which was exemplified by her failure to participate in the disciplinary proceedings or meet the requirements of rule 955.

GREGG ALAN STANFORD [#109433], 42, of Orangevale was disbarred July 31, 1997, and ordered to comply with rule 955.

Stanford failed to comply with rule 955, a requirement of an August 1996 disciplinary order. The disbarment recommendation followed a default hearing.

In his prior disciplinary matter, Stanford received a six-month actual suspension for misconduct which involved commingling and issuing bad checks. He wrote 23 checks on his client trust account for more than $4,000 in personal expenses. In addition, five checks were returned by the bank for insufficient funds.

Following a default hearing, BRADLEY LEE THOMPSON [#116297], 42, of San Diego was disbarred July 31, 1997, and ordered to comply with rule 955.

Thompson failed to comply with rule 955, a requirement of a 1996 disciplinary order. At that time, Thompson received an 18-month actual suspension.

Considered as an aggravating circumstance was his prior record of discipline, the 1996 actual suspension. At that time his misconduct included one matter involving fraudulent conduct, including bad faith, dishonesty and concealment which significantly harmed his client.

He was found culpable of failing to perform services for a client who employed him for representation in a construction litigation matter regarding the roof of his home. He also failed to properly supervise three attorneys who were assigned by him at various times to the case.


Suspensions/Probation

The Supreme Court denied petition for writ of review by HUNSDON CARY STEWART [#46008], 54, of Los Angeles and suspended him for five years, stayed, placed him on probation for five years with an actual suspension of two years and until he proves rehabilitation, and ordered him to comply with rule 955. The order took effect July 11, 1997.

Stewart had appealed the recommendation of a State Bar Court hearing judge, but the review department increased the recommended discipline significantly.

The review department found that for a little more than a year, Stewart used his client trust account as his personal checking account. He also used it to hide assets from his creditors, including his former wife and the IRS, to whom he owed about $30,000 in back taxes.

He also wrote 17 bad checks on the account.

Stewart has been disciplined twice previously, both resulting in actual suspensions. In one case, he failed to perform legal services competently, commingled personal and entrusted funds, failed to pay out entrusted funds on demand, and misappropriated $1,000 in client funds.

In the second matter, he was convicted of misdemeanor battery on a police officer after he refused to leave his estranged wife's apartment. The record before the hearing judge did not contain the conviction matter, but the review department considered the second prior as an aggravating circumstance.

The review judge also rejected Stewart's argument that he used the trust account for the "legitimate" purpose of holding funds "under an assignment for the benefit of creditors." He argued that he was under court orders to pay overdue spousal and child support and was therefore obliged to prevent levies from other creditors.

The judge found that Stewart's issuance of insufficiently funded checks because he did not review his bank statements was "grossly negligent" and therefore involved moral turpitude.

GORDON REY JOHNSTON [#53834], 59, of San Jose was suspended for one year, stayed, placed on probation for two years with an actual 60-day suspension, and was ordered to take the MPRE within one year. The order took effect July 17, 1997.

In a default matter which went to the State Bar Court's review department on a request by bar lawyers, the review department increased the recommended actual suspension from 45 to 60 days. The review judge accepted the hearing judge's findings that in a personal injury case, Johnston failed to perform legal services competently or communicate with his client, and he misled his client about the status of the case. He also held himself out to his client as eligible to practice law during a period when he was suspended for failure to pay bar dues. Johnston did not cooperate with the bar's investigation.

The review department increased the actual suspension period based on Johnston's default and for holding himself as eligible to practice when he was not.

As a result of his actions, his client sued for malpractice and won a judgment of nearly $20,000. Johnston had not made all the payments at the time of the default trial.

In mitigation, Johnston practiced law for 12 years without discipline prior to the misconduct in question.

FRANK W. MASSE [#39760], 55, of San Pedro was suspended for 90 days, stayed, and placed on probation for one year. The order took effect July 17, 1997.

Masse was privately reproved in 1995 and ordered to take the CPRE and file quarterly probation reports. In this matter, he stipulated that he missed filing his last probation report and did not take the CPRE.

In mitigation, he was candid and cooperative with the bar during its investigation.

GREGORY ZITANI [#112816], 40, of Sarasota, Fla., was suspended for two years, stayed, and was placed on probation for two years with an actual six-month suspension and until he makes restitution of a total of $5,900 in three client matters. If the actual suspension exceeds two years, he will remain suspended until he proves rehabilitation. He also was ordered to comply with rule 955. The order took effect July 17, 1997.

Zitani stipulated to multiple counts of misconduct. He failed to perform legal services in three cases, and because of his failure to supervise employees, his client trust account was misused and a client's signature was forged on a declaration submitted under penalty of perjury to the court.

One client's case was dismissed when Zitani bounced the check used to pay the filing fee.

Zitani did not deposit client funds in a client trust account, failed to refund unearned fees, and when he disbursed settlement funds without his clients' permission, he did not provide an accounting to the clients.

In mitigation, Zitani suffered emotional difficulties because of health and marital problems. After he and his wife separated, they later reconciled and moved to Florida, where Zitani does pro bono work once a week. He had practiced law in California without discipline for 10 years before his misconduct.

MICHAEL CHARLES MOUSTAKAS [#55953], 56, of Northridge was suspended for 18 months, stayed, and placed on probation for two years with an actual 60-day suspension and until he makes restitution to two people. If the actual suspension exceeds two years, he must prove rehabilitation. He also was ordered to take the MPRE within a year. The order took effect July 17, 1997.

Moustakas stipulated to nine counts of misconduct stemming from his representation of two people involved in an automobile accident. He did not obtain the written informed consent of the clients of their potential conflict of interest.

In both cases, he did not pay their medical liens for nearly a year after receiving settlement funds and did not maintain proper records of the funds. One client was owed money after his bill was renegotiated, but Moustakas has not paid him.

Moustakas also received a settlement for property damage for one of the clients, but did not pay the amount in full or keep proper records.

Both clients complained separately to the bar about Moustakas, but he did not cooperate with bar investigators.

Moustakas also failed to perform legal services in three other personal injury cases. In one, he never paid a medical lien despite settling the matter for $15,000; in another, he did not pay attorney's fees to his client's previous lawyer pursuant to a lien. The lawyer won a small claims judgment for attorney's fees against Moustakas.

In the third matter, Moustakas' client was sanctioned by the court when Moustakas did not respond to four sets of interrogatories. When the client hired a new lawyer, Moustakas did not sign a substitution form for six weeks. He did not keep his client informed of developments in the lawsuit, and did not return numerous phone calls or respond to four letters.

He did not cooperate with the bar's investigation.

In mitigation, Moustakas' professional and personal life was disrupted by the Northridge earthquake, when some of his records were destroyed. He also had ongoing medical problems.

JOHN HODGSON MITCHELL [#41489], 54, of Irvine was suspended for three years, stayed, and was placed on three years of probation with an actual 60-day suspension and until he proves his rehabilitation. He was ordered to take the MPRE within one year. The order took effect July 17, 1997.

After substituting into a personal injury case resulting from a truck accident, Mitchell sued a corporate defendant that did not purchase the truck in question until 16 months after the accident. The defendant won sanctions of almost $20,000 against Mitchell for filing a suit in bad faith, which was found by the court to be without merit, frivolous and intended only to cause delay.

When Mitchell appealed the sanctions, the Court of Appeal affirmed, finding that the action was prosecuted in bad faith and for no proper purpose. It awarded $2,500 in attorney's fees to the defendant. The court concluded that the appeal was meritless, frivolous, and filed solely to delay an adverse judgment.

Mitchell did not pay the sanctions or the attorney's fees.

Mitchell was disciplined in another case in 1995; his probation requirements included attending ethics school, taking the client trust account course, and filing quarterly probation reports and certificates from a certified public accountant. He did not comply with any of those requirements by the deadlines, but he has since completed the conditions.

Mitchell has been disciplined previously, but not for any matter involving clients. He continues to negotiate a settlement of the truck accident case.

MICHAEL DAVID MARK [#112959], 39, of Los Angeles was suspended for 30 days, stayed, placed on two years of probation and was ordered to take the MPRE within a year. The order took effect July 17, 1997.

Mark deposited settlement funds for a client in his general business account rather than a client trust account. The client asked to receive the money in monthly installments and some were paid late.

Mark failed to retain the balance of settlement funds withheld to pay fees and costs in his client trust account. When asked for an accounting of the funds by the bar, Mark could not produce complete records.

In mitigation, he has no record of discipline since his 1984 admission to the bar and he cooperated with the bar's investigation.

DAVID FRANCIS GROSSMAN [#46766], 52, of Encino was suspended for one year, stayed, placed on probation for five years with an actual six-month suspension, and was ordered to take the MPRE within one year and to comply with rule 955. The order took effect July 17, 1997.

Grossman took over a personal injury case from an attorney who resigned from the State Bar with disciplinary charges pending. Neither Grossman nor the resigned attorney informed the client of the resignation.

When the case settled, Grossman negotiated the check but gave the

client's share to the former lawyer for delivery. After taking out a portion for his fee, Grossman gave the rest of the settlement funds to the former lawyer, who was expected to pay a medical lien and keep a portion for his fee. The ex-lawyer gave the client her share but never paid the medical lien.

A collection agency for the medical provider obtained a default judgment against the client, which was later vacated.

Grossman stipulated that his actions constituted an act of gross negligence and that he failed to pay settlement funds promptly.

Grossman was disciplined in 1978 following a conviction on three felony counts of possession of cocaine with intent to distribute.

GUIDO ROY SMITH [#75055], 46, of Orange was actually suspended for six months beginning July 17, 1997, and was ordered to comply with rule 955.

Smith stipulated that he failed to perform legal services competently by failing to timely file a motion to set aside a default entered against his clients in November 1992 in Orange County Superior Court. The motion contained a declaration that he had suffered a nervous breakdown and lost his clients' file.

In mitigation, Smith was undergoing radiation for treatment of leukemia at the time.

He has a record of discipline, including a 1992 public reproval and a 1993 suspension and probation.

HAROLD V. SULLIVAN II [#39889], 56, of Inglewood was suspended for one year, stayed, placed on three years of probation with an actual 60-day suspension, and was ordered to take the MPRE within one year. The order took effect July 17, 1997.

Sullivan failed to respond to clients' status inquiries, keep clients informed of developments in their cases and perform legal services competently.

A personal injury attorney, he maintained four offices consisting of seven attorneys and 15 staff persons, handling about 1,600 cases. Sullivan speaks Vietnamese and Spanish, and most of his clients were Indo-Chinese or Hispanic.

For about a year, one of his secretaries hid and threw away files, notices and pleadings. Only when she left did employees of the firm discover the cache of documents, which included at least one motion to dismiss an action.

Among the documents were pleadings in two cases which are the subjects of this discipline; Sullivan missed several court hearings, and both cases were dismissed. However, the court found that in both cases, the problems could have been avoided if Sullivan had properly supervised the secretary and a good review system had been in place.

Sullivan had sought review of a hearing judge's recommendation, arguing that the recommended 89-day actual suspension was excessive. The review judge reduced the suspension to 60 days, and reversed the hearing judge's finding that Sullivan was not culpable of failing to give a client all papers and property. The review judge also reversed one finding that Sullivan failed to keep another client reasonably informed.

There was significant mitigation, including more than 21 years of blemish-free practice, and the fact that even before the State Bar began its investigation, Sullivan closed three of four offices, reduced his staff, and reduced his caseload from 1,600 to 50. The review judge therefore reduced the actual suspension from 89 to 60 days.

ROBERT A. DePIANO [#89341], 44, of Greenwood Village, Colo., was suspended for three years, stayed, and placed on three years of probation with an actual three-year suspension and until he proves rehabilitation. Credit toward the actual suspension will be given for an interim suspension which began Jan. 22, 1996. He also was ordered to take the MPRE within one year. The order took effect July 17, 1997.

In 1995, DePiano was convicted of conspiracy to impede the collection of federal income taxes. The charge stemmed from his representation of Reuben Sturman, a millionaire producer and distributor of books, videos, movies and magazines. Sturman orchestrated a massive, multimillion-dollar tax conspiracy in which he tried to conceal his assets through shell corporations and offshore bank accounts, among other things.

Although his role in the conspiracy and in each individual transaction was minor, DePiano knew Sturman was facing allegations of tax conspiracy and tax evasion when he helped Sturman transfer assets in a way that concealed Sturman's ownership interests.

In mitigation, DePiano has no prior record of discipline, cooperated with the bar's investigation, and presented numerous letters attesting to his good character.

RONALD LEON ALLEN [#78708], 52, of Citrus Heights was suspended for 18 months, stayed, placed on one year of probation and was ordered to take the MPRE within one year. The order took effect July 17, 1997.

In handling two probate matters, Allen failed to obtain required court approval of checks drawn against estate accounts issued to pay his fees.

In mitigation, he has no prior discipline record and no clients were harmed by his actions.

ZVONKO SKULJAN [#118371], 42, of Santa Rosa was suspended for one year, stayed, placed on two years of probation with a 60-day actual suspension, and was ordered to take the MPRE within one year. The order took effect July 17, 1997.

Skuljan stipulated to misconduct in his handling of two bankruptcy matters.

A few months after filing a bankruptcy petition, he filed a motion to dismiss the proceeding and agreed to a dismissal with prejudice, which by law barred his client from filing another petition for 180 days.

When the client faced foreclosure on a piece of property in Washington state, the client developed a fraudulent plan to transfer the property to a corporation, which would then declare bankruptcy. The corporation was not licensed to do business in Washington, but his client told Skuljan that he planned to obtain a business license.

Skuljan then filed a Chapter 11 bankruptcy petition on behalf of the corporation in a district other than the client's personal bankruptcy venue. The court eventually granted the creditor relief from the automatic stay and transferred the case back to the original federal court, recommending sanctions. Sanctions amounting to $20,000 were imposed against both Skuljan and his client.

In a second bankruptcy matter, Skuljan violated his fiduciary obligations to the trustee by agreeing to hold certain client funds in trust, and then releasing the funds to his clients and using the money to pay their litigation expenses.

In mitigation, Skuljan had no prior record of discipline and he cooperated with the bar's investigation.

KENNETH BUCKWALTER [#50213], 50, of Auburn was suspended for two years, stayed, placed on three years probation with an actual 90-day suspension and until he proves rehabilitation. He was ordered to take the MPRE within one year and to comply with rule 955. The order took effect July 27, 1997.

Buckwalter stipulated to misconduct involving his handling of an estate. He obtained a $20,000 loan from the estate without obtaining court approval and without obtaining the written consent of the estate's executor, even though he advised the executor of the need to consent in writing.

When a dispute arose over the disposition of some of the property, Buckwalter served as the personal attorney for the former executor, who had been removed. When the dispute was settled, Buckwalter did not advise his client of his right to seek independent counsel, nor did he obtain the client's written consent to the terms of the settlement where Buckwalter knowingly acquired a pecuniary interest adverse to his client.

The client later filed a malpractice suit against Buckwalter, which was settled.

Buckwalter's actions were surrounded by bad faith and overreaching because he did not return any portion of the loan money to the estate.

In mitigation, he practiced without any discipline since his 1972 admission to the bar.

REBECCA AMELIA TAPIA [#83053], 52, of Downey was suspended for three years, stayed, and placed on three years of probation with a 20-month actual suspension. She also was ordered to make restitution and pass the MPRE within one year. Credit toward the period of interim suspension which began Oct. 31, 1995, will be given. The order took effect July 27, 1997.

In a conviction matter, Tapia pleaded guilty in 1995 to three counts of violating the government code for altering court dockets. She was sentenced to three years of probation and ordered to make restitution and undergo counseling.

In a second matter, she stipulated that in a child support matter, she ignored two requests by her former client's successor attorney to return the client's file.

She also did not respond to her former client's request that she return $5,000 in advance fees. She did not appear at the fee arbitration because she miscalendared the hearing. When the arbitrator awarded her former client $5,250 plus interest, she did not pay the award.

In mitigation, Tapia suffered from hepatitis and was diagnosed with chronic fatigue syndrome, resulting in severe physical and psychological stress.

She has not paid the arbitration award due to her financial difficulties.

The probation of VICTOR SALAS JR. [#138107], 37, of Santa Paula was revoked and the previously ordered stay of his suspension was revoked July 27, 1997. He was given a six-month suspension, stayed, placed on probation until Aug. 12, 1999, and given a 60-day actual suspension.

Salas violated the terms of a 1995 probation by failing to file quarterly probation reports, attend ethics school or the client trust accounting school.

He originally was disciplined for failing to deposit proceeds from settlement checks in a client trust account and to maintain the balance required to pay the medical liens.

LINCOLN MINTZ [#37610], 55, of Oakland was suspended for 90 days, stayed, and placed on probation for two years, effective July 31, 1997. He was ordered to pass the MPRE.

Mintz failed to comply with the conditions of a 1995 private reproval. He neglected to file quarterly probation reports and take the CPRE, provide proof of completion of four hours of MCLE classes and complete the bar's ethics school course by September 1996.

Mintz' prior record of discipline, the 1995 private reproval, was considered a factor in aggravation. There were no mitigating circumstances.

The probation of JILL MORTON [#135107], 51, of Berkeley was revoked and the previously ordered stay of suspension lifted, effective July 31, 1997. Morton was actually suspended for 10 months and ordered to comply with rule 955.

Morton failed to comply with requirements of an April 1996 discipline order. She did not file quarterly probation reports, statements regarding non-possession of controlled substances and mental health reports.

The 1996 discipline order resulted from her misdemeanor conviction of possession of a controlled substance, LSD.

RICHARD DANA WILLIAMS [#92376], 44, of San Jose was suspended for three years, stayed, and placed on probation for four years on the condition that he is actually suspended for two years and until he has shown proof of his fitness to practice law. He also was ordered to pass the MPRE and comply with rule 955. The order was effective July 31, 1997.

Williams' misconduct involved his failure to advise two clients of a potential conflict of interest by his joint representation of them and filing false and frivolous allegations of collusion by a federal office.

In January 1994, Williams was hired to represent a couple who were indicted by a federal grand jury in the Western District of Tennessee.

The indictment followed a search of the couple's northern California home by the U.S. Postal Inspector and the seizure of property belonging to the clients.

Williams represented both clients, one of whom was found guilty on 11 counts and the other on 10 counts.

Williams did not inform the clients that there was a potential and/or actual conflict of interest in his representation of both of them.

He then filed a pleading in northern California alleging that his clients and the court had been victims of fraud and deception by the U.S. Attorney's Office, the U.S. Magistrate Judge and his staff, and possibly the federal court's own clerk.

He later filed another pleading which attempted to relate his clients' criminal matters to unrelated litigation then pending in the northern district of California.

In August 1994, a federal judge denied Williams' requests to relate the cases for an evidentiary hearing, characterizing his papers as "nearly incoherent" and his allegations as "patently frivolous" and "patently false."

The judge also advised Williams to "inform his clients that at least one court has raised serious doubts as to his ability to practice law and ably represent them in this matter."

In another matter, the bar found that Williams recklessly failed to perform legal services and respond to a client's reasonable case status inquiries.


Public Reproval

RUSSELL ROBERT RUIZ [#123414], 43, of Santa Barbara (March 7, 1997)

JOSEPH O. CAMPEAU [#134874], 67, of Long Beach (June 14, 1997)

MICHAEL K. GROVES [#110645], 45, of Palm Desert (June 15, 1997)

JEFFREY F. SKLAN [#87742], 43, of Huntington Park (June 15, 1997)

DONETIA R. MESHACK [#118044], 39, of Inglewood (June 26, 1997)


Resignation/Charges Pending

LAWRENCE M. ZOLOT [#68112], 47, of San Diego (July 17, 1997)

ELIZABETH LEVINE [#152003], 35, of San Mateo (July 17, 1997)

PAUL D. FARB [#147774], 45, of Fresno (July 17, 1997)

CHARLES W. BOYLE [#92457], 44, of Atlanta (July 17, 1997)

KATHLEEN P. KEELER [#121647], 45, of Laguna Hills (July 17, 1997)

ADELAIDA E. REYES [#85275], 64, of Los Angeles (July 17, 1997)

RICHARD E. PERITZ [#31420], 62, of El Cerrito (July 20, 1997)

ANN E. COCHRAN [#69587], 55, of Sherman Oaks (July 20, 1997)

LAWRENCE J. HANNAN JR. [#75606], 61, of Sacramento (July 27, 1997)

BERNICE E. LAPOW [#61823], 51, of Berkeley (July 27, 1997)

MARC R. WELTON [#157865], 34, of Santa Ana (July 27, 1997)

JAMES D. TAYLOR [#123866], 42, of Sacramento (July 27, 1997)

STEVEN A. SCHUTTE [#147020], 33, of San Diego (July 27, 1997)

BARBARA L. THOMAS [#104960], 53, of San Francisco (July 27, 1997)

NEIL B. RINCOVER [#151418], 43, of Los Angeles (July 27, 1997)

JAMES HERMAN DAVIS [#26396], 67, of Los Angeles (July 31, 1997)


Suspension/Failure to Pass PRE

JAMES J. BLISS [#153703], 46, of Poway (July 23, 1997)

WILLIAM MARTIN WITTKE [#68053], 57, of San Diego (July 23, 1997)

JAMES C. TEVINI [#88159], 57, of Brisbane (July 29, 1997)

FRANK DANIEL CARDINAL [#60749], 47, of Rancho Cucamonga (July 30, 1997)

DOYLE EUGENE BERRY [#42506], 66, of Anaheim (Aug. 6, 1997)


Reinstatement

MICHAEL L. LUBOVISKI [#74725], 52, of Long Beach (Aug. 1, 1997)

[CALBAR JOURNAL]