California Bar Journal
OFFICIAL PUBLICATION OF THE STATE BAR OF CALIFORNIA - FEBRUARY 2000
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California Bar Journal

The State Bar of California


REGULARS

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Front Page - February 2000
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News Briefs
Appeal court denies bar's petition to reverse Brosterhous
Fee bill introduced
Bar fee arb program gears up
David Bryson, Loren Miller recipient, dies at 58
Board to name one to Judicial Council
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You Need to Know
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Opinion
From the President - For our system to work, we need to be involved
Let's let public lawyers take a seat at the table
The illusion of a cosmetic fix
Letters to the Editor
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MCLE Self-Study
The Supreme Court and the ADA
Self-Assessment Test
MCLE Calendar of Events
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Appointments
Access commission seeks members for 2 positions
Apply to serve on a bar committee
Bar seeks applicants for ABA delegates
Judge evaluation positions open
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Discipline
Ethics Byte - 'Rampant' conflicts in a new economy
Attorney suspected of soliciting murder of bar prosecutor
Attorney Discipline
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Legal Tech - If the hype is right, ASPs are H-O-T
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Public Comment
David Bryson, Loren Miller recipient, dies at 58
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David B. Bryson, a poverty lawyer and expert in the field of housing law, died Christmas Day of lung cancer. Mr. Bryson, 58, received the Loren Miller Legal Services Award, the State Bar’s highest honor, last October in recognition of a 29-year career devoted to the legal needs of the poor.

As deputy director of the National Housing Law Project in Oakland, Mr. Bryson litigated cases, drafted legislation, wrote manuals and provided advice to housing attorneys throughout the country.

So great was his expertise, said Florence Wagman Roisman, an associate law professor at Indiana University, that “no responsible housing advocate in the United States would undertake to do anything out of the ordinary without first consulting David Bryson.”

A graduate of Princeton University and Columbia law school, Mr. Bryson was a self-effacing man who preferred working in the trenches to advancing to administrative posts.

Perhaps his most critical legal victory for public housing advocates was a 1987 case in which the U.S. Supreme Court gave public housing residents the right to sue over alleged violations of federal housing law.

The case benefitted literally millions of public housing residents, Roisman said.

A resident of Piedmont, Mr. Bryson is survived by his wife, two sons and a daughter. The family requested that contributions in Mr.  Bryson’s memory be made to the NHLP, 314 Grand Ave., Suite 320, Oakland 94610.