California Bar Journal
OFFICIAL PUBLICATION OF THE STATE BAR OF CALIFORNIA - SEPTEMBER 1999
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DISCIPLINE

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CAUTION!
More than 167,385 attorneys are eligible to practice law in California. Many attorneys share the same names.

All discipline reports should be read carefully for names, ages, addresses and bar numbers. Attorneys must report address changes within 30 days.

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DISBARMENTS
ANDRE F. ZEEHANDELAAR [#145799], 52, of San Diego was disbarred July 3, 1999, and ordered to comply with rule 955 of the California Rules of Court.

Zeehandelaar was charged with misconduct in six client matters and was found by the State Bar Court to have committed 27 ethical violations, including five counts of moral turpitude, one count of misappropriation of client funds and abandonment of several clients.

Two clients won malpractice judgments against him; five lost either their causes of action or personal property or assets because of his actions. He also filed a bad faith bankruptcy petition to avoid collection of damages by one client.

In a divorce case, the court ordered a county marshal to remove Zeehande-laar's client's husband from the family home after he collected his belongings. The same day, Zeehandelaar impersonated a marshal and denied the husband access to the home. He told the husband's attorney that he had hired a locksmith to open the residence and the husband's home office, where he worked as an engineer. Zeehandelaar also said he would sell the man's computer equipment unless he received $3,000 in attorney's fees.

He subsequently disobeyed three more court orders that the husband be permitted to retrieve his personal belongings and computer equipment. The court eventually entered sanctions of $6,500 against Zeehandelaar which he never paid.

Zeehandelaar was hired by another client to both handle a family law matter and to file a personal injury claim. He never did either and as a result, the client won a $254,718 malpractice judgment against him.

He continuously told his client that he had filed the personal injury claim; the bar court found that those misrepresentations amounted to moral turpitude.

In the third matter, Zeehandelaar was hired by a couple to represent their son in three criminal matters. He convinced the man's mother to give him the pink slip to her son's car as temporary collateral pending his billing.

The couple then signed a retainer agreement with Zeehandelaar and paid him $2,300 in advance fees. Zeehandelaar forged their son's name on the pink slip and sold the car without their knowledge or consent.

He later asked the couple for $1,500 to hire a psychiatrist for their son; they paid, and the psychiatrist administered a one-hour test. Zeehandelaar then took a private investigator, who shared his office, to jail to visit the client.

He suggested the client hire the investigator. Instead, the client fired Zeehandelaar.

The next day, Zeehandelaar asked the client's parents for - and they paid - $2,500 to hire the private investigator, not knowing Zeehandelaar had been fired.

After the court relieved him as counsel in the case, the parents repeatedly and unsuccessfully sought return of the car and a refund of unearned fees.

Zeehandelaar also represented a retired, 70-year-old nurse who was hospitalized with cancer. Because she was heavily medicated, she was disoriented and confused.

The client thought she was dying and asked Zeehandelaar to prepare her will. He prepared two wills, claiming the first was invalid, and charged her $300 for each.

Several months later, without the client's knowledge, Zeehandelaar hired several people to clean her mobile home while she was hospitalized.

In his fee statement, he charged $4,488.66 for eight people to clean her home over a period of 151.5 hours. He also charged his $150-per-hour fee to clean the home, as well as $20 an hour for his wife's services.

The client also asked Zeehandelaar to obtain a domestic restraining order against her daughter, with whom she had a difficult relationship. He charged her $16,800 for this service.

He also charged her $3,785 to have a walk-in shower and railing installed in her home, as well as for other work she had not requested, including retiling her bathroom, replacing the carpet and installing blinds.

(The court dismissed this count because simply exceeding a client's wishes does not constitute an act of moral turpitude, and Zeehandelaar did not benefit from the improvements.)

Zeehandelaar also deposited $25,000 of the client's funds into two CD accounts, and did not return the money when she requested it. He misappropriated more than $14,000 of that money.

When the client sued him for fraud, conversion, breach of fiduciary duty and malpractice, Zeehandelaar filed a bankruptcy petition; the bankruptcy court found it was filed in bad faith and ordered sanctions of $2,750 to be paid the client.

He had filed four bankruptcy petitions between 1986 and 1993 which were dismissed. The client won a judgment of more than $80,000.

Zeehandelaar has a prior record of discipline for similar offenses; he abandoned two clients, failed to comply with a court order to pay sanctions, and failed to cooperate with the bar's investigation.

SUSPENSIONS/PROBATION
JAMES JOSEPH BROWN III [#169686], 43, of Thousand Oaks was placed on probation for three years beginning Feb. 10, 1999.

Brown pleaded guilty to driving with a blood alcohol level of .08 or higher in 1998 and was sentenced to three years of probation.

He has a record of prior discipline. He was publicly reproved in 1996 for reckless driving and driving on a suspended license, was suspended and placed on three years of probation in February 1998 for violating the terms of that probation, and two months later was placed on five years of probation and given a one-year actual suspension for two consolidated cases including a conviction for spousal abuse and another matter involving failure to perform legal services competently, return a client's papers, refund unearned fees and maintain proper records.

GARY LELAND ASHTON [#37361], 58, of Sonora was suspended for five years, stayed, placed on seven years of probation with a six-month actual suspension, and was ordered to make restitution, take the MPRE within one year and comply with rule 955. The order took effect June 11, 1999.

In January 1994, Ashton was retained as the attorney of record in the probate of the estate of his 84-year-old client's husband. The client was to receive $65,000 in May 1994 as the payoff on a piece of property she owned.

In May, Ashton asked the client for a $75,000 loan, to be secured with a second deed of trust on his residence. The client agreed and signed a note which set the interest rate at 4 percent "until the principal balance reaches $50,000," when the rate would increase to 6 percent.

Ashton did not explain that under those terms, the balance would never go down to $50,000. He also did not advise his client to seek independent legal counsel about the loan, and she did not consent in writing to the terms of the loan.

Ashton made monthly payments to his client totalling $750 and then stopped making payments. His house was foreclosed on in August 1996, and the client became aware at that time that there was a first deed of trust for $60,000 on Ashton's home.

Ashton did not take any action to probate the estate after January 1994, and his client dismissed him.

He stipulated that he entered into a business transaction that was adverse to his client, and he failed to act competently.

In mitigation, Ashton has no record of discipline in 28 years of practice.

LEE SHERMAN MEYER [#174820], 28, of San Diego was suspended for one year, stayed, placed on two years of probation with an actual 20-day suspension, and was ordered to make restitution, take the MPRE within one year and comply with rule 955. If the actual suspension exceeds two years, he must prove his rehabilitation. The order took effect July 3, 1999.

Hired to seek a modification of child support payments for a client, Meyer never filed the motion.

He also did not refund $1,200 in advanced fees, failed to respond to the client's telephone, written and e-mailed inquiries, and did not cooperate with the bar's investigation.

DONALD JAMES SANDERS [#153933], 54, of Playa Del Rey was suspended for one year, stayed, and placed on two years of probation with an actual 30-day suspension. The order took effect July 3, 1999.

Sanders stipulated that he did not properly maintain client funds in trust, and did not cooperate with a bar investigation of his conduct.

He had deposited a $10,000 check from a client in his trust account, and removed that portion designated as advanced fees.

He then wrote three checks for the benefit of other clients.

In mitigation, Sanders made restitution to the client. He is suffering from depression related to his divorce.

Sanders was disciplined last year for failure to perform legal services competently, respond to client inquiries, or cooperate with the bar's investigation.

THOMAS EDWARD WHITE [#41181], 58, of Twain Harte was suspended for four years, stayed, placed on four years of probation with an actual two-year suspension, and was ordered to take the MPRE and comply with rule 955. The order took effect July 3, 1999.

White represented a married couple and a third individual to handle the sale of their business. At the same time, he represented the couple in unrelated matters and knew they were having financial problems, a fact he did not disclose to the third client.

When the business was sold, White was the escrow holder, responsible for distribution of the buyers' payments and for providing an annual accounting of the money he received.

Although he sent the third client itemized reports, they were either unclear in part or did not include an accounting of payments made to the couple. The buyer of the business stopped making payments, but White took no action to demand full payment. He also did not respond to the third client's numerous requests for a full accounting of the payments.

When his dispute with the third client went to mediation, White did not produce complete bank records, particularly those showing evidence of nine payments made by the buyers.

White sued the buyers on behalf of his three clients; at issue were the number of payments made by the buyers and White's accounting for the money received. He did not disclose his adverse interests in the litigation.

The third client eventually fired White, but he still did not produce the requested bank records.

The State Bar Court found that White represented adverse interests without the informed written consent of his clients, failed to disclose to his clients a personal or professional interest in the subject matter of the representation, failed to adequately communicate with a client, misrepresented to a client and a mediator his handling of escrow funds and failed to render an appropriate accounting.

Over an eight-year period, White also wrote 38 checks on his client trust account to pay personal bills, commingling personal and client funds.

White has a prior record of discipline for failing to competently perform legal services, communicate with clients, comply with court orders or cooperate with a bar investigation, and for making false statements to a court.

MYRON ROY SIEGEL [#47145], 56, of Sherman Oaks was suspended for two years, stayed, placed on two years of probation with an actual suspension of 120 days and until he makes restitution, and was ordered to take the MPRE and comply with rule 955. If the suspension exceeds two years, he must prove his rehabilitation. The order took effect July 3, 1999.

Siegel stipulated to 12 counts of misconduct in six consolidated cases.

In the first matter, he mishandled an $11,000 settlement he received for a client. Although the money was deposited in his client trust account, the balance fell to just over $200, when he should have maintained at least $9,500 in the account. His paralegal issued a $9,500 check to the client, which bounced. The client did not receive his funds for five months.

Siegel stipulated that he failed to maintain client funds in a client trust account, misappropriated client funds, did not deliver client funds promptly, and committed an act of moral turpitude.

In a wrongful death case, Siegel's legal administrator contacted the family of a victim regarding Siegel's possible employment. Siegel told his employee he was not interested in handling the case. Nonetheless, the client hired Siegel and provided pertinent documents.

For about six months, without Siegel's knowledge, his employee gave the client updates about the case. When the client hired a new lawyer, he sought the file and a substitution of attorney form with Siegel's signature. For the next three months, Siegel's staff called the client in an effort to be rehired.

Siegel stipulated that he failed to perform legal services competently as a result of not supervising his staff, and that he failed to return the client's file.

In a personal injury case, two clients employed Siegel's paralegal to represent them. His signature was forged on a medical lien agreement with a doctor's office. When an insurance adjuster contacted the office, the paralegal told him she was handling the case.

The clients eventually fired both Siegel and the paralegal. When questioned about the matter by the State Bar, Siegel said he knew nothing about it. He stipulated that he failed to supervise his staff.

Another personal injury case was dismissed because Siegel did not respond to discovery. He failed to perform legal services competently or communicate with a client.

In other cases, he did not keep a client informed about developments in a case, performed incompetently, and did not return advanced fees.

In mitigation, Siegel recognizes that his failure to supervise his staff led to much of the misconduct. At the time of the problems, he was suffering from mild depression, which affected his practice.

JAMES CHRISTOPHER WOODWARD [#73225], 47, of Newport Beach was suspended for five years, stayed, placed on five years of probation with an actual three-year suspension, and was ordered to make restitution of $50,000 plus interest, take the MPRE and comply with rule 955. The order took effect July 3, 1999.

Woodward stipulated to 17 counts of misconduct in three consolidated cases.

The first involved two personal injury cases for a client who faced medical bills of more than $160,000. The client's former attorney had filed a lien for $7,744 for fees and costs against any recovery from the insurance company.

One of the two cases settled for $25,000, and although Woodward told the client he would pay a lien in favor of Orange County for more than $6,000, he did not do so because there were insufficient funds after payment of other liens, costs and expenses and a payment to the client.

Woodward settled the second case for $100,000, which he received in payments of $30,000 and $70,000. He did not tell the client about the larger payment, but she learned of it from the insurance company and made repeated efforts to contact Woodward to receive her settlement proceeds.

She hired another lawyer, and Woodward made a partial payment of $30,000. Letters, phone calls and faxes were unsuccessful and eventually the client went to the police. At that time, Woodward paid the client another $30,000 and wrote a check to Orange County to cover the lien, but he never sent it.

He stipulated that he failed to communicate with his client, keep her informed of developments in her case, and misled the client and misappropriated her money, both acts of moral turpitude.

Woodward settled a personal injury case for another client for $300,000. When he deposited the check in his client trust account, it brought the balance to $300,036.01. He paid co-counsel their fees, and then wrote a check for $30,000 to the client in the first case.

The clients in this matter were owed a total of about $141,000; Woodward wrote three checks amounting to more than $112,000, but the balance in his trust account fell to $1,341.59. When one client tried to cash a check for $42,000, she learned Woodward had insufficient funds to cover the check. He later paid her $500 and said he was selling a country club membership and would pay the remainder of her money from the proceeds of that sale. However, he had been ordered to sell the membership to pay more than $90,000 he owed judgment creditors in a malpractice case.

Woodward eventually paid the client the full amount she was owed, plus interest plus $15,000 to compensate her for any damages.

He stipulated that he misappropriated funds, an act of moral turpitude, and misled a client.

In a third personal injury case, Woodward convinced his clients to reject a settlement offer by agreeing to indemnify them in the event of a defense verdict and an award of costs. Judgment was entered against his clients, as well as costs of $52,000. Although Woodward said he would appeal, he never did.

For four months, Woodward's clients tried to contact him by phone and fax to determine the status of the case and the costs. During that time, the malpractice judgment against Woodward ordered the sale of the country club membership.

When the clients learned that a lien had been filed against their home, they hired a new attorney. Woodward told the new lawyer about the club membership, but did not say there were other potential claimants to the proceeds of the sale. The clients eventually were forced to execute a note for $50,000, on which they continue to make payments.

Woodward failed to provide legal services competently, communicate with his clients, or keep them informed of developments in their case, and by entering into the indemnification agreement, he put his interests ahead of his clients', an act of moral turpitude.

Woodward was privately reproved in 1994, but failed to comply with the conditions attached to the discipline. He also was publicly reproved a year later.

In mitigation, he made restitution to two clients and the malpractice judgment caused severe financial problems. He has a long record of community service and pro bono involvement and presented a wide range of references attesting to his good character.

ALAN PERRY THOMAS [#60096], 53, of Glendale was suspended for five years, stayed, placed on five years of probation with an actual four-year suspension, and was ordered to take the MPRE. Credit will be given for an interim suspension which began April 25, 1997. If the suspension exceeds two years, he must prove his rehabilitation. The order took effect July 3, 1999.

Thomas pleaded no contest to three counts of insurance fraud in 1996 as a result of spending four years in business with another attorney and three non-lawyers who engaged in soliciting accident victims and receiving fraudulent settlements.

He allowed his name to be used by another lawyer, allowed others to process insurance claims under his name, signed papers in cases he didn't handle, and had no access to general and trust accounts bearing his name. A non-lawyer brought in cases, settled them, and Thomas made the payments. The non-lawyer took 60 percent.

Thomas has cooperated with several law enforcement agencies in the investigation and prosecution of criminals involved in capping, insurance fraud, extortion and related violent crimes. He has potentially placed himself and his family in danger. He initially became involved in the shady law practice because of overwork, stress and seizures that clouded his judgment.

MARK MORRIS [#129656], 46, of Beverly Hills was suspended for four years, stayed, placed on five years of probation with a 30-month actual suspension, and was ordered to make restitution, prove his rehabilitation, take the MPRE and comply with rule 955. The order took effect July 3, 1999.

Morris stipulated to misconduct in 18 consolidated cases.

The majority involved his failure to maintain client funds in trust (16 counts), allowing the balance in his client trust account to fall below the required amount (13 counts), and failure to pay medical providers (11 counts). Some of his conduct, such as writing bad checks and letting his trust account balance fall, constituted acts of moral turpitude.

He also failed to communicate with clients, perform legal services competently, or return client files, and he withdrew from representation without protecting his clients' interests.

In mitigation, Morris cooperated with the bar's investigation, took steps to rectify the financial harm he caused, and voluntarily closed his law office. He also was an alcoholic and drug addict, whose problems were exacerbated by the death of his brother from a heroin overdose. He has been sober since 1996.

MARY FRANCES RICHARDSON [#112861], 53, of Claremont was suspended for two years and until she proves her rehabilitation, and was ordered to comply with rule 955. The order took effect July 3, 1999.

In November, 1997, Richardson was disciplined for the unauthorized practice of law, failing to advise her client she was suspended in 1994 for nonpayment of her bar dues, failing to keep her membership records current and failing to cooperate with the bar's investigation.

She did not comply with the conditions of that discipline order: she did not change her address with the bar's membership records, and failed to file two quarterly probation reports.

Richardson did not appear in the disciplinary proceeding and her default was entered.

MITCHELL K. JAYSON [#108416], 51, of Palm Desert was suspended for three years, placed on three years of probation with a one-year actual suspension and until he makes restitution, and was ordered take the MPRE within one year and comply with rule 955. If the actual suspension exceeds two years, he will remain suspended until he proves his rehabilitation. The order took effect July 3, 1999.

Jayson was disciplined in 1997 after stipulating to misconduct in three consolidated cases, all involving client abandonment. He was placed on two years of probation and actually suspended for 30 days.

In a default proceeding, the State Bar Court found that he violated the terms of that probation by failing to file quarterly probation reports, provide proof that he joined the bar's Law Practice Manage-ment Section, provide evidence of restitution payments or maintain a current address.

In addition to the 1997 discipline, Jayson was privately reproved for failing to act competently, return an unearned fee, and keep a client informed of developments in his case, and for improperly withdrawing from employment.

MICHAEL H. INMAN [#160042], 37, of Los Angeles was suspended for one year, stayed, placed on one year of probation with an actual 30-day suspension, and was ordered to make restitution and take the MPRE within one year. The order took effect July 3, 1999.

In 1995, Inman represented three plaintiffs in a civil dispute regarding investments on real property loans. After filing a complaint, he did not respond to or inform his clients about any developments in the case: interrogatories and a request for production of documents, depositions, motions to compel, and two orders for sanctions of $973 and $1,092. The clients were forced to dismiss the action and subsequently faced a malicious prosecution lawsuit which cost one client more than $20,000 plus $7,000 in attorney's fees.

He failed to perform legal services competently or keep his clients informed about significant developments in their cases.

At the time of the misconduct, Inman suffered from a serious amphetamine and marijuana problem. He has been sober since February 1996. He has paid part of the sanctions and continues to pay as he is financially able.

IAN LANE KERNER [#176616], 28, of Los Angeles was suspended for three years, stayed, placed on three years of probation with a six-month actual suspension, and was ordered to take the MPRE and comply with rule 955. If the actual suspension exceeds two years, he must prove his rehabilitation. The order took effect July 3, 1999.

Kerner stipulated to 15 counts of misconduct in 15 consolidated cases.

A new attorney, Kerner's conduct resulted from the trust he placed in a longtime family friend, Gus Luciano, who took advantage of him. Luciano, an attorney who is not licensed in California, agreed to assist Kerner in establishing a personal injury practice. Kerner did not realize until after the practice was set up that Luciano is not a California lawyer.

Kerner opened a client trust account in his name, but provided Luciano with a signature stamp bearing Kerner's name. For about a year, Luciano and his associates, some lawyers and some not, operated a law firm under Kerner's name. They apparently opened dozens of files in Kerner's name and forged his signature on retainer agreements, correspondence, doctors' liens and insurance drafts. In addition, it appears that either Luciano or one of his employees settled cases without authority, forged clients' signatures on documents and drafts, either forged Kerner's signature or used his stamp on drafts, and misappropriated thousands of dollars in settlement funds.

When Luciano was arrested, Kerner cooperated with law enforcement.

He stipulated to 15 counts of failing to supervise the handling of his client trust account, acts of moral turpitude. However, he did not learn about the misappropriation until after Luciano was arrested, and there is no evidence he misappropriated any funds.

Kerner stipulated that his conduct enabled Luciano and his associates to misappropriate client funds.

In mitigation, Kerner cooperated with law enforcement and the bar. His misconduct was viewed as a single course of conduct relating to the mismanagement of his client trust account, rather than numerous separate violations. He has changed his practice and takes sole responsibility for his trust account.

Kerner found about 115 files in his name among the papers seized by the FBI after a search of Luciano's property. He spent between $6,000 and $7,000 of his own money in providing client representation in these personal injury cases. He represented 47 clients and reached 11 settlements.

ROBERT JESS ORDUNA [#98182], 34, of Antioch was suspended for three years, stayed, placed on four years of probation with an actual six-month suspension, and was ordered to make restitution, attend the State Bar's client trust accounting course, take the MPRE and comply with rule 955. The order took effect July 16, 1999.

The State Bar Court found that Orduna wrote a check against insufficient funds in his client trust account, an act which constitutes moral turpitude.

In a bankruptcy matter, he failed to perform legal services competently because he did not properly follow the court's rules: he failed to promptly seek approval of his employment and he accepted certain payments without the court's permission. He also did not seek the court's approval of his fees, and the bar court therefore found that he charged and received an illegal fee. In addition, he failed to refund some of his client's money to pay a creditor.

Orduna has a prior record of discipline: he was suspended and placed on probation in 1992 for failing to properly manage entrusted funds, he commingled personal and client funds, and he did not cooperate with the bar's investigation of his conduct.

In mitigation, he has done considerable pro bono work for the Battered Woman's Alternative program in Contra Costa County, he has hired a paralegal to assist him in his practice, and he cooperated with the bar's investigation.

JOHN R. ORTEGA [#45716], 64, of Compton was suspended for one year, stayed, and placed on probation for one year. The order took effect July 18, 1999.

The bar court found that Ortega misused his client trust account by permitting issuance of six checks for personal expenses and one for a political contribution.

At the time of the misconduct, Ortega was seriously ill, suffering from congestive heart failure, prostate disease, diabetes and a bleeding ulcer. Manage-ment of his office fell to his wife, who was unaware of the regulations governing client trust accounts.

Because Ortega was having tax problems, the IRS had seized all his bank accounts except his client trust account. His wife deposited rent checks from several properties the couple owned in the client trust account, commingling that money with fees from some personal injury cases. Ortega's secretary was paid with funds from the account, and Ortega made a political contribution using trust account funds.

In mitigation, several witnesses attested to Ortega's good character, he does regular pro bono work and is a community volunteer. His medical condition also was considered mitigating.

INTERIM SUSPENSION
GAIL ANN EASTON [#79988], 47, of Palo Alto was placed on interim suspension May 14, 1999, following her conviction on one count of the unauthorized use of computer data. She was ordered to comply with rule 955.

PHILIP J. GIRARDIN [#142664], 52, of Glendale was placed on interim suspension May 16, 1999, following his conviction for driving under the influence with a prior, a felony. He was ordered to comply with rule 955.

WILLIAM RANDOLPH NEILL [#43582], 57, of Los Angeles was placed on interim suspension May 22, 1999, following his conviction for preparing false documentary evidence, a felony involving moral turpitude. He was ordered to comply with rule 955.

GUY MANNING [#139071], 40, of Las Vegas was placed on interim suspension June 11, 1999, following his conviction for possession of a controlled substance and driving under the influence. He was ordered to comply with rule 955.

TIMOTHY LEE DAVIS [#141612], 45, of San Diego was placed on interim suspension June 24, 1999, after he pleaded guilty in March to assault with a semi-automatic firearm and making a terrorist threat, both felonies. He was ordered to comply with rule 955.

DUNCAN THOMAS MORAN [#157560], 34, of Santa Monica was placed on interim suspension July 8, 1999, following a conviction for assault with a deadly weapon, evading an officer, possession of a controlled substance and driving under the influence. He was ordered to comply with rule 955.

WILLIAM PETER GEORGE DOUBLE [#130599], 52, of Redondo Beach was placed on interim suspension July 15, 1999, following his conviction for money laundering, conspiracy and obstruction of federal tax laws. He was ordered to comply with rule 955.

BOBBY ABRAMS [#106769], 51, of Tarzana was placed on interim suspension July 17, 1999, following a pandering conviction. He was ordered to comply with rule 955.

TIMOTHY ERIC MEYER [#101098], 44, of Sherman Oaks was placed on interim suspension July 17, 1999, following his conviction for one count of grand theft. He was ordered to comply with rule 955.

RESIGNATIONS/CHARGES PENDING
JERRY W. VARNADO [#153451], 55, of Oakland (March 13, 1999)

FRANK ANDREW DORNAY [#91326], 47, of Fresno (March 13, 1999)

STANLEY A. LANGFUS [#48157], 53, of Hollywood (March 13, 1999)

ANTHONY GHIRARDELLO MARRIOTT [#150634], 52, of Los Angeles (April 18, 1999)

DAVID LESTER ARNOPOLE [#56470], 52, of Los Angeles (April 23, 1999)

EDWARD P. LAUFER [#103337], 49, of El Cajon (April 25, 1999)

ALLEN DAVID SHUGAR [#38695], 66, of Marina del Rey (April 25, 1999)

BRUCE REID BACON [#55430], 55, Twin Falls, Idaho (May 13, 1999)

GARY PAUL MILLER [#74789], 50, of Encino (May 13, 1999)

WILLIAM W. KLEIN JR. [#95326], 51, of Pleasanton (May 13, 1999)

SCOTT DOUGLAS RAPHAEL [#111948], 41, of Newport Beach (May 21, 1999)

RONALD TREVOR SUTTON [#35720], 62, of Marina del Rey (June 11, 1999)

GEORGE EDWARD WEISS [#85336], 56, of Anchorage, Alaska (June 11, 1999)

JONATHAN LOUIS SMALL [#94327], 46, of Los Angeles (June 11, 1999)

CHARLES AUGUSTUS CONNORS III [#124264], 41, of San Mateo (June 11, 1999)

JAMES MICHAEL GRAHAM [#71016], 50, of Sacramento (June 11, 1999)

TODD CURTISS GASKILL [#39106], 58, of Rocklin (June 11, 1999)

JAMES CHARLES GRISAFI [#100829], 43, of La Mesa (June 19, 1999)

SUSPENSION/FAILURE TO PASS PRE
LEWIS E. NOTRICA [#24374], 74, of Encino (June 2, 1999)

RONALD URCEL CARTER [#122387], 52, of Bakersfield (June 18, 1999)

CLIFTON DONALDSON BLEVINS [#47481], 57, of San Diego (June 18, 1999)

PAUL YANEZ [#100492], 46, of Anaheim (June 18, 1999)

DAVID LYNN [#73718], 52, of Los Angeles (June 18, 1999)

RICHARD UPSON HARKER [#24308], 76, of Encino (June 21, 1999)

LARRY JAMES BRYANT [#80908], 53, of Los Angeles (June 21, 1999)

OLIIVIA T. IBARRA [#71307], 48, of Long Beach (June 21, 1999)

PHILLIP MATHEW CONNOR [#69702], 50, of San Diego (June 30, 1999)

RICHARD J. MATHERS [#147175], 35, of Fairfax, Va. (June 30, 1999)

LOUIS SOSA FLORES [#570178], 64, of Santa Fe Springs (July 7, 1999)