California Bar Journal
OFFICIAL PUBLICATION OF THE STATE BAR OF CALIFORNIA - JULY 2001
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California Bar Journal

The State Bar of California


REGULARS

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Front Page - July 2001
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News / News Briefs
Two-year fee bill goes to governor
Janet Reno, low-cost MCLE highlight Annual Meeting
Stanley Mosk dies at 88
State Bar wins ABA's Harrison Tweed Award for pro bono, legal access, IOLTA efforts
Foundation will accept grant applications beginning July 16
Winnebago of justice serves those on the road less traveled
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Trials Digest
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Legal Tech - Matter management is not just for litigators
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Opinion
From the President - Public members bring fresh views
Holding judges accountable
Letters to the Editor
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MCLE Self-Study
Alcohol and the workplace
Self-Assessment Test
MCLE Calendar of Events
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Ethics update...
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You Need to Know
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Public Comment
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Discipline
Ethics Byte - Level field or a judicial practical joke?
Former DA disbarred for drunken-driving coverup
Attorney Discipline
Stanley Mosk dies at 88
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Stanley Mosk, the influential and independent associate justice who served a record 37 years on the California Supreme Court, died last month at the age of 88. He worked in his office until the day before his death and authored a majority opinion released just days earlier.

Stanley Mosk"Stanley Mosk was a giant in the law," said Chief Justice Ronald George, who Mosk hired as a deputy attorney general when Mosk was California's attorney general. "The body of Stanley Mosk's work is not-able not only for its quantity, but for its quality. In opinions touching on such diverse topics as jury selection, racial discrimination, products liability, the rights of disabled parents and arbitration of health care issues, he has brought his powers of analysis to bear and has reached results that time and again have been echoed by the United States Supreme Court and the supreme courts of other states. Justice Mosk has been an eloquent proponent of federalism and of independent state constitutional grounds."

Mosk was named to the Supreme Court on Sept. 1, 1964, by Gov. Ed-mund G. "Pat" Brown. He began his career as a public servant in 1939 as the executive secretary and legal advisor to Gov. Culbert Olson. He served as a judge of the Los Angeles Superior Court from 1943 to 1959, when he became attorney general.

A strong advocate of individual liberties, Mosk began to rely on the state Constitution as a way to preserve those rights while the U.S. Supreme Court became increasingly conservative. Although he offered a liberal perspective to the court, Mosk sometimes sided with his conservative colleagues on criminal issues. He wrote the controversial Bakke decision in 1976, finding race-based university admissions unconstitutional.

During his long tenure, he wrote dozens of landmark decisions, ranging from enhanced environmental protections to new guarantees for criminal defendants and an increased ability to file personal injury claims.